Yesteryears '

In 1951, busy night in 'bastille

NINETY YEARS AGO -- 1911

Notwithstanding rumors to the contrary, the Pacific Power and Light transferred the city water system to the custody of the city authorities Monday, the tentative custodian of the plant being the fire and water committee of the city council.

W.H. Walton, editor of the News, returned fromn a 400-mile automobile trip through central Oregon and tells of its vastness, its possibilities of great development, the magnificent scenery and also of the hardships its sturdy pioneer residents have endured, and are in many instances still enduring.

One of the largest audiences of the season assembled at Heilbronner hall Tuesday evening to hear Frank H. Leonard, the eminent Christian Scientist lecturer.

EIGHT YEARS AGO -- 1921

Apple thieves removed a number of boxes of high-grade apples from valley farms over the weekend.

From the editorial page: "Some of our local aspirants to the Ku Klux Klan have had a narrow escape. They might have been kleagles now if the sound comnmon sense of the vast majority of residents of this county had not prevailed."

A survey of citizens who attended the Lunch club meeting this week has revealed that they feel Hood River County's greatest need is for a community hospital.

VERBATIM, Oct. 5, 1928

"Ladies Invited to Lunch Club --

A City Beautiful will be exemplified in lantern slides at next Tuesday's meting of the Lunch Club at the Waukoma hotel. C.B. Lewis, chairman of publicity and education of the Pacific Coast Association of Nurserymen will exhibit a number of lantern slides taken in a national City Beautiful Contest, and the slides will show what has been done at Davenport, Iowa.

In view of the fact that much of the beautification of the yards of homes invariably falls to the women, members of the Lunch club are inviting their wives and other ladies to see these pictures. The club meets at noon next Tuesday."

SEVENTY YEARS AGO -- 1931

In its second win of the season, Hood River's football team whipped Goldendale 45-0.

From the editorial page: "We wonder if there is one fruit grower in this beautiful and productive valley who, be he ever so poor, would change places with any of the hundreds of thousands who are daily in the bread lines of the big cities."

SIXTY YEARS AGO -- 1941

The plan of creating a series of national parks in thet Cascades and Columbia River gorge, credited to Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes, has been abandoned.

Twenty more local young men have been ordered to report to the induction station of the United States Army at Portland.

To prepare against the possibility of a coming shorage of high-grade footwear, I.D. Parkins of Parks, Inc., was in Portland this week to place his order for Florsheim shoes for the coming spring.

FIFTY YEARS AGO -- 1951

If the "no vacancy" sign had been hung up at the city jail on a certain day last week when 28 men were lodged in the local bastille, then it would have been fitting and proper to hang up the "SRO" sign this past Sunday. Some 46 men -- almost all transient -- enjoyed the comforts of the jail at one time or another that day. Most were picked up on public streets for being drunk. It was another rainy day during the fruit harvest.

J.E. Klahre, president of the Apple Growers Association, has been named president of the Northwest Horticulture council. Hundreds upon hundreds of tons of rock were blasted away from the face of Stanley Rock at Koberg's beach to be used as fill for the new Columbia River highway.

FORTY YEARS AGO -- 1961

An entire year's work toward the rehabilitation of summer steelhead runs in the Hood River may have been lost as a result of a flash flood a couple of weeks ago which sent tons of silt and debris down Ladd canyon from the base of Ladd glacier, depositing a foot-deep layer of silt throughout the west fork.

Hood River City council has halted fire calls to rural homes on the edge of the city limits by the city fire department "We're never going to annex anyone if we don't stop offering them all the advantages of the city for nothing," city council member Dean Wright pointed out.

THIRTY YEARS AGO -- 1971

Construction on Hood River Junior High's new multi-purpose building has stopped, and when it resumes a new contractor will be completing the work. School superintendent Frank Lariza blamed the shutdown on an apparent error in the original bid which made contractor William B. Frederick unable to complete the project.

Tim Copper, former valley football star, returned to Dartmouth this fall and is slated for the starting safety role and will continue to return punts and kicks.

October sales featured a $3,515 1971 Matador Station Wagon at Smith's Autocenter, and Chiquita bananas went at 13 cents a pound at Rosauers.

TWENTY YEARS AGO -- 1981

With time running out on the present county landfil, the Hood River County Board of Commissioners cleared the way for a new privately owned and operated transfer station and recycling center here Monday.

Under warm sunny skies, the 20th Blue Star Marker in Oregon was dedicated at the Port of Hood River Marina near the visitor center and state police office building this week.

TEN YERS AGO -- 1991

The Port of Hood River projects are closing in on completion, including work on Wells Island and at Big 7. Wetlands mitigation work on Wells Island began Monday morning and was scheduled to be completed this week.

Meanwnile, commissioners accepted a $104,550 bid from Phil Howell Construction for tenant improvements at Bit 7, located in the Diamond Complex.

From the editorial page: "Those leaders in the wood product industry given to projections contend that the U.S. demand for wood and paper projects will double by the year 2040. Unfortunately, if they look more deeply into their own industry, their projections would be hard do support. With the current trend accelerating, there will hardly be an increasing demand for new homes and remodeling among those working in the wood products industry."

An 18-year-old Portland man, who's as suspected Red Cobra gang member, is scheduled to enter a plea in Hood River Ciurcuit Court to five counts stemming from a January burglary here.

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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