Clean canines: ‘Dog Wash’ helps pet assist program

Soap suds, second only to cats as a dog’s main nemesis, flowed over fur Saturday at Hood River Saturday Market.

The fundraiser for a local canine aid group raised about $300, with dozens of pooches undergoing gently scrubbing hands and a cool rinse — and even a doggie pedicure.

The dog wash, benefiting the non-profit PROD, Promoting Responsible Ownership of Dogs, was the brainchild of market director Lisa Conway, who put it together with Lisa Willis of Gorge Dog, a Hood River shop specializing in canine products. Pat Combs added her nail clipping skills.

With their owners standing by, most dogs strained at their leashes but could not get away from the two Lisas.

“A lot of them are real nervous, but no one’s been bitten,” said Combs, of Dinah’s Dog House, which has a shop at Alpine Veterinary Clinic in Hood River. “Everyone’s been really good.” Once clean, the dogs received a canine cookie, courtesy of Gorge Dog.

“It’s really appreciated. Every little bit helps,” said Cleo Stirling, who directs PROD. “We spend about $1,000 a month in our spay and neuter program by local veterinarians,” she said.

PROD, a Klickitat County-based organization finds homes for unwanted dogs and provides pet foster care and spay/neuter services in the Mid-Columbia. PROD can be reached at 1-509-538-2397; the group currently has two seven-month-old special needs Shepherd mix dogs up for adoption.

PROD is also hosting the second in its series of “Dog Talks,” Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at Riverside Community Church. Dog owners can attend — without their dogs — and ask a canine trainer behaviorist questions. (Please see Happenings, Page B2, for details.)

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