Yesteryears

Twelve-minute meters `issued' by police in 1962

NINETY YEARS AGO -- 1922

At the recent Eastern Star installation the following Star "points" were installed: Sara Howes, Adah; Mrs. Herbert Field, Ruth; Mrs. A.S. Keir, Esther; Mrs. A.E. Woolpert, Martha; and Mrs. Lottie McLain, Electra.

At a meeting of the city council the entire list of city officers was again appointed. They were as follows: city attorney, E.C. Smith; water superintendent, W.T. Price; street commissioner, A. Samuels; city marshal, W.E. Hart; night officer, M.B. Webster; fire chief, John Volstorff; fire marshal, Lou Margan; fire truck engineer, J. Wendling; city engineer, E.E. Newell; and traffic officer, Vernon Murray.

VERBATIM -- Jan. 26, 1923

"Forum opposes ban on Japanese

At a special meeting of the Parkdale Forum held last Sunday considerable time was devoted to discussion of various bills which are now before the state legislature.

By unanimous vote, and after mature consideration, it was decided to write to write to Hood River's representatives in the state legislature, urging them to oppose the anti-Japanese bill now before the house and senate.

It was also decided by unanimous vote to urge support of all measures aiming at stricter enforcement of the prohibition law.

Next Sunday, the bill which aims at taxing of church property will be considered and passed upon.

It is noteworthy that Hood River, which was formerly considered to be one of the centers of anti-Japanese agitation, is now apathetic concerning the bill, introduced by the American Legion, which aims at the prohibition of land-ownership by Japanese and other ineligible for citizenship. While, for the year 1921, sales and leases of land to Japanese practically ceased, the tendency has changed and Japanese, as evidenced by the county court records, are now able to purchase and lease land here."

SEVENTY YEARS AGO -- 1932

Maybelle Cooper and Dorothea Franz were joint hostesses at a waffle supper Wednesday evening at the A.B. Cooper residence on Hull Street. Three tables were cleverly arranged and decorated. Cards and games served as entertainment. Guests were Jean Isenburg, Margaret Bosque, Margaret Cooper, Barbara Howell, Clifford Anderson, Lester Young, Douglas Button, Albert Fleek, Malcolm Kresse and Donald Nance.

One of the responsible positions of the Oregon State Teachers association was awarded a teacher in the Hood River public schools at a recent convention in Portland. E. Moore Neave, teacher of geography and penmanship at Park Street and junior high schools, was selected president of the state council of geography teachers.

SIXTY YEARS AGO -- 1942

Out of many weeks of discussion a definite proposition was forthcoming from Hood River County court Tuesday for the exchange of the present courthouse and the First National Bank building across from Oak Street.

The forest service reported that the old ranger log cabin, located near Bottle Prairie Hill Road, six miles east of the Mt. Hood Loop highway, had been destroyed by a fire of unknown origin. The old ranger cabin at Brooks' meadow had been used primarily as an overnight stopping place.

FIFTY YEARS AGO -- 1952

Four vicious bobcats are spread out in the snow after being shot Tuesday afternoon by Bob DeHart of Parkdale in the vicinity of Red Hill. The casts were feasting on the remains of a freshly killed deer when gunned down by DeHart.

Official dedication of the new Wy'east High School near Odell will take place Sunday afternoon, Feb. 17, according to Hood River County School Superintendent George Corwin.

FORTY YEARS AGO -- 1962

A blaze that started at about 9:30 a.m. destroyed the packing plant of Stadelman Fruit Inc. of Odell. Cold storage facilities were saved but the loss was still estimated to be in the area of $115,000.

Acceptance of the resignation of Hood River County Sheriff Rupert Gillmouthe as civil defense director and the appointment of Jan Kurahara as his successor in the CD post were announced by County Judge Harris A. Higgins.

In a move designed to ease parking problems, city councilmembers approved a recommendation by its police committee Monday to issue 12-minute parking meters.

THIRTY YEARS AGO -- 1972

A longshoreman's walkout in Portland, and developments in connection with it, will have a critical effect on Hood River Valley's fruit industry. That was the conclusion arrived at by three major fruit shippers here this week.

Boy and girl ski teams at Hood River Valley High School swept a league meet and set a fast pace last week in league action on the slopes. Their dual win gave them the driver's seat early in the race for the league title.

The Hood River interstate toll bridge set a new record for revenues in 1971. Bridge tolls totaled $433,699.25 in the calendar year, about $65,000 more than received in the previous year.

TWENTY YEARS AGO -- 1982

United Telephone Co. of the Northwest has completed arrangements to lease and remodel the Les Schwab Tire Center building on Oak Street as one segment of a major building program being undertaken this year. It is part of an effort to provide working space for its current employees, while also planning for local growth, according to a company spokesman.

An informational hearing on proposed Cascade Street improvements is scheduled for Thursday, kicking off formal procedures required for the project. The proposed street improvement consists of a two-inch asphaltic concrete overlay and some base repair with total replacement of the curb on the north and south side of the roadway, except for a small section of curbing on the south side. No widening of the street is planned.

Orators from Hood River Valley High School won sweepstakes in two categories in a 36-school tournament at McMinnville. Principal Charles Bowe said the Hood River team led by Geoff Moore, coach, achieved what no other team from HRV had done in the past. Hood River was awarded with a second sweepstakes award overall, and the Hood River junior team won first sweepstakes.

TEN YEARS AGO -- 1992

The Hood River Valley Eagles basketball team had four players in double figures as they beat The Dalles Indians 72-60 in Tri-Valley Conference action.

At least two tons of Hood River Memorial Hospital's obsolete medical gear and supplies were packed onto a moving truck to be stored and cataloged for future use in reinfranchised nations formerly under Soviet rule.

Fifty years of marriage was celebrated by Joe and Gertrude Sheirbon on Dec. 17, and honored by their children and grandchildren with a Golden Wedding Anniversary party at the Pine Grove Grange Hall on Dec. 19.

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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