Folk musicians perform in ‘house’ concert

Folk musicians Curtis and Loretta will play a house concert on Nov. 10 at 3 p.m., at the home of Kristen Dillon and Paul Blackburn in Hood River.

Curtis and Loretta, voted the 2001 outstanding folk musicians in Minneapolis/St. Paul, tends towards the Celtic end of things, singing harmony and playing multiple intruments. Recent accolades include “acoustic virtousity on guitars, mandolin and Celtic harp ... perfect harmonies” (Dirty Linen) and “serious talents” (Radio Limerick, Ireland).

The concert will be at 401 Montello, Hood River. Tea and cookies will be served. Admission is an $8 donation to the Mid-Columbia Folklore Society.

Curtis and Loretta had so many requests at their concerts for a recording of the song Loretta wrote about her dad’s Alzheimer’s that they were inspired to head for the recording studio. The result was “Gone Forever”; her dad’s song is the CD’s title cut. The songs speak of journeys taken, bridges crossed, and new worlds discovered. While half of the cuts are originals, there are also Celtic songs, two instrumentals, and two covers. Once again, the duo’s striking harmonies take center stage, while Loretta plays Celtic harp and guitar, and Curtis alternates between mandocello, guitar, mandolin, clawhammer banjo and ukulele.

Curtis wrote “Don’t Keep a Sailor Away From the Sea” while he was crewing on a sailboat halfway between Hawaii and San Francisco. It’s a traditional sounding tune which says you can’t keep a sailor away from the sea.

Traditional tunes include the harp instrumental “Banish Misfortune”, along with “Carrickfergus”, “The Minstrel Boy”, and “Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye”. “Streetsinger’s Heaven” written by Bob Bovee and done on clawhammer banjo. is pure old-time. And it’s recess when they pull out the ukelele and kazoo for the country swing classic “Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette)”.

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