Letters to the Editor for October 22, 2011

Bridge Woes, Join Heroes Club efforts, Support Klamath restoration, more...

Bridge woes

How do you do it? Going southbound over the bridge, I had to wait for 20 minutes to get past the bridge painting only to be stuck for another 25 minutes because flaggers at the overpass were oblivious to the lineup and only allowing four vehicles at a time through the light.

And then I had to pay 75 cents for the pleasure of losing nearly an hour. Amazing.

How do people do this every day?

Gary Rains

Hood River

Join Heroes Club efforts

A recent letter to this column mentioned the Gorge Heroes Club. I will expound on this club.

The Gorge Heroes Club consists of patriotic members of our Mid Columbia Area - Hood River, Wasco, Skamania and Klickitat counties - who choose to support freedom for America by the showing of love to those men and women from our area that are placing their lives between our comforts and those who want to destroy America's freedom foundation.

These men and women are a part of our community and need items such as:

Baby wipes

Sunscreen

Toothpaste and tooth brushes

Toilet paper

Gum

Hard candy, individually wrapped

Food bars

Trail mix

Amway's Skin-So-Soft

Tuna with crackers (small packets at Dollar Tree)

Chicken salad with crackers (at Dollar Tree)

Socks

Bug-off

There are several other items but I can't think of them right now. You can come to the Heroes Club meeting on the fourth Wednesday of each month at WAAAM to assemble these items into care packages which cost money to ship to the war zones. The time is 5:30 p.m.!

This is where you and I are needed; for the burden is heavy when only a few carry it. We as a community can and need to do our part in lifting their spirits.

Please come and join us!

Bobbi Reisner

Hood River

Support Klamath restoration

I recently visited Klamath Falls and learned about the landmark Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement that will end decades of bitter disagreement over water rights and fish passage in this watershed. Seven years ago local farmers, Indian tribes, agencies and the dam-owning utility met with members of the Oregon congressional delegation who said: "Craft a mutual agreement, a local solution and we will pass it in Congress."

Now, after seven years of hard work, compromise and meetings an agreement has been reached - but Senator Jeff Merkley is the major Oregon congressional supporter to date.

To ensure federal passage of the agreement Sen. Wyden and Congressman Walden also need to support this agreement. The alternative? Additional years of dissention and delay.

In the words of a local tribal leader, "Healing is possible through water; the water that sustains us all." Sen. Wyden and Congressman Walden, help make this healing happen.

Peter Cornelison

Hood River

Treason

and religion

Thank you, Mr. Earley, for raising a valid point in your Oct. 15 letter, re "Senseless Wars." You state that these drones would have been beneficial in the Korean War, but you seem to condone these acts of enemy encouragement via this newspaper giving space to these demonstrations against our government's deploy of electronic weaponry.

Treason defined: "Assisting the enemy psychologically in a war against our government's armed forces."

These treason demonstrators would bring more cheer to our troops if they marched ahead of our troops along these bomb-infested roads with the H.R. News bringing "up the rear." They might get a "bang" out of that.

Publicizing these local events tells the enemy that these marchers are in agreement with their cause as was Pres. Barack Hussein Obama's pastor when, from the pulpit he stated, "-damn America," with Senator Obama sitting there in agreement.

Also, Mr. Earley mentions our guaranteed "Freedom of Religion," the most abused of all freedoms. It does not say "church and state." We must go back to the days of our Founding Fathers and their sufferings under their former government to understand why they made it very clear that no interference would be allowed by government and religion was defined then as worshiping the one and only true God of creation.

Alan Winans

Hood River

'Taking U.S. Back'ward

I have been seeing signs and ads around town with the slogan, "Take America Back." From what I've heard those who are sponsoring these ads want to take the United States back to the 19th century.

These sponsors want to take us back to when we had no laws against children working in coal mines; when there was no Social Security and many elderly lived in gross poverty; and people died young without medical care; and when there was no regulation of the quality of medicine and food.

They want to transport us back to the time when there was no protection of the environment; little quality public education (except for the rich); no unemployment insurance; and banks and Wall Street had free rein to satisfy their greed.

Don't take my word for this. Just listen to what they are saying. I don't think I want to take America back to that. I want America to progress forward.

Bill R. Jones

The Dalles

Start writing

I don't want coal shipments going through the Gorge. I don't want to wash coal dust out of my hair and clothes and have my children and great-grandchildren contract black lung disease. I don't want the Gorge to become an environmental cesspool just to help the Chinese turn us into a Third World country.

I urge everyone to contact the Sierra Club and any other advocacy group and actively support them. Write governors Kitzhaber and Gregoire, senators Merkley, Wyden, Cantwell and Murray, your Congressional representative and any other elected official involved and demand they start representing those who elected them and not those who bought them.

Jerry Giarraputo

Hood River

Watching

the river

Are all dams (and their removals) created equal? That (Condit) dam removal is being proposed in response to concerns about threatened fish species, physical fragmentation of rivers, and to return a more "natural" hydrologic regime to a system poses interesting challenges to the community:

Does the removal of the Condit dam next week represent a geomorphic disturbance to a quasi-adjusted fluvial system? How can we predict the interactions among sediment transport and deposition, vegetation establishment and responses of aquatic ecosystems over time and space?

If I were in charge of re-licensing the dam in the last decade, I may not have wanted to deal with the frenzy of pro-demolition citizens who know, in their earnest hearts, that hydropower presents some hazards to human and ecological communities.

One scientist who I respect (and agree with) puts it this way: "In spite - or perhaps because - of (these) uncertainties, dam removal is a very attractive scientific problem … river response to dam removal represents a real-time experiment to a known perturbation - a rare opportunity for those who study rivers…" (Grant, G. 2001. Dam removal: Panacea or Pandora for rivers? Hydrol. Process. 15, 1531-1532).

I will be as close to the White Salmon River as possible on Wednesday morning.

Claudia von Flotow

Hood River

Editor's note: Access will be limited in the area of the dam. See Page A5 for details.

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