March of Dimes honors local nurses

Three women from the Gorge — Melodi Johnson, Patricia Gilbert and Jeri Foster-Horracks — were honored as exceptional nurses from across Oregon Nov. 2 at the annual March of Dimes Nurse of the Year awards breakfast, presented by Oregon Health & Science University.

With nearly 400 nurses nominated, the statewide committee selected 16 winners in a blinded process.

The three local winners all work at Mid-Columbia Medical Center in The Dalles:

n Small Hospital category — Melodi Johnson, a resident of Hood River

n Emergency — Jeri Foster-Horrocks, a resident of The Dalles

n Nurse Educator — Patricia Gilbert, a resident of Hood River

While the immense value and profound effect that all nurses have on our lives was noted and celebrated, these 16 nurses were acknowledged for their constant care, compassion and dedication to improve the quality of others’ lives through service.

Advance Practice — Yun Long Ong, OHSU

Charge Nurse: — Cindy Bell, OHSU

Community Health: —Charmika Schuster, OHSU

Critical Care: Kate Thomas, — Legacy Meridian Park Hospital

Distinguished Nurse of the Year — Leda Isabel Garside, Tuality Healthcare

General Medical and Surgical Services — Jennifer Zeck, Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center

Hospice, Home Health, Long Term, Rehab and Pallative Care — Kathy Graham Gadler, Legacy Hospice

Mental Health — Marianne Zundel, PeaceHealth Sacred Heart

Nurse Leader — Nancy Simonson, St. Charles Medical Center

Pediatrics — Allison Franco, Doernbecher Children’s Hospital

Rising Star — Faisal Mutua, Legacy Emanuel Hospital

Women’s Health — Amy Kaiser, Tuality Healthcare

Chaired by Dr. Joe Robertson, president of OHSU, and emceed by Amy Troy, anchor for KOIN Local 6, this event was a benefit for March of Dimes. With the support and involvement of 40 health organizations and medical centers, Nurse of the Year raised nearly $90,000 to help fund the mission of improving the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality.

March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide and its premier event, March for Babies, the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality.

For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.com or nacersano.org. Find out what’s going on in the Greater Oregon Chapter by visiting OregonMOD.com.

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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