Tasar World Championships hit Cascade Locks

Columbia Gorge Racing Association hosts global event

T A S A R WORLDS racing action, seen here Tuesday afternoon, runs through Saturday on the Columbia just east  of Cascade Locks.

Photo by Adam Lapierre.
T A S A R WORLDS racing action, seen here Tuesday afternoon, runs through Saturday on the Columbia just east of Cascade Locks.

Like a colony of fire ants chasing one another in well-orchestrated lines and patterns, a massive fleet of racers with nearly identical boats and bright red patterned sails have been tacking and jibing in front of Cascade Locks all week during the 2013 Tasar World Championships.

The week-long sailing event, run by the Columbia Gorge Racing Association, started Aug. 10 and wraps up with final racing Saturday afternoon (wind-dependent), when new world champions are hailed for this specific type of two-person, 14-foot dinghy, called a Tasar.

A strong showing from U.S., Canada and Australia and others from Japan, Great Britain and the Netherlands make up the fleet of 59 racers who, in pairs of two, have been running courses all week — usually three per day — in a lowest-score-wins format of racing.

Among the international field, two Gorge-area teams are representing the local sailing scene. As of deadline Friday morning, Jamie and Andy Mack were in 13th place with 121 points and Phiilip Gordon and Jonathan Cannard were in 16th with 135 points. The points leaders before the day’s heats were the Seattle-based duo Anthony Boscolo and Haley Lane, with a low score of 33 points.

Teams get points according to their place in each race (1st place is 1 point, 2nd is 2 points and so on), points are accumulated throughout the week and the lowest scores rate the best.

This is the second time the Tasar Worlds have come to Cascade Locks, with the first in 1996 sparking the formation of the CGRA, which now hosts a full schedule of championship-level sailing events every summer based out of its Cascade Locks Marina headquarters.

CGRA also hosts free community sailing nights Thursday through August, the final two of which are Aug. 22 and Aug. 29.

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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