Drummond named BPA director

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Energy Department has chosen Bill Drummond to be the new administrator for the Bonneville Power Administration. As BPA’s administrator, Drummond will be responsible for managing the nonprofit federal agency, which markets carbon-free power from Columbia River hydroelectric dams and the region’s one nuclear plant.

BPA also operates most of the surrounding power grid, distributing wind and other energy to the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

“Bonneville represents the best expression of public vision and achievement; collaborative relationships, environmental steward-ship and a commitment to operational excellence,” said Drummond. “I am grateful for this opportunity and look forward to my new role at BPA.”

Drummond’s leadership of BPA is part of a larger strategy to help lead the 21st century transformation of the nation’s electricity sector. According to the BPA press release on Drummond, “reliable and affordable electricity is a foundation of economic growth and a resilient electric grid also helps to better protect our national security.”

Drummond currently serves as BPA’s deputy administrator and has worked in the energy industry for more than 30 years.

“The leadership of BPA is critically important because America’s continued global competitiveness in the 21st century will be significantly affected by whether we can efficiently produce and distribute electricity to businesses and consumers, seamlessly integrating new technologies and new sources of power,” said Secretary of Energy Steven Chu.

Chu went on to say, “I look forward to working with Bill Drummond to help lead BPA’s transition to a more flexible, resilient, and reliable electric grid and establish much greater coordination among system operators in partnership with its customers.”

“Drummond has had a stellar track record during his time at BPA and throughout his career in the energy sector,” said Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman. “I am fully confident in his ability to provide the highest level of leadership and service to BPA’s customers, constituents, and employees.”

Drummond holds dual degrees; one in forestry from the University of Montana and one in economics from the University of Arizona. He began serving as BPA’s deputy administrator in October 2011, and his duties included providing strategic leadership and executive management to the agency.

In addition to his responsibilities as deputy, he oversaw the agency’s general counsel, and the departments of compliance and governance, risk management, internal audit, public affairs, finance, and corporate strategy functions.

Before joining BPA, Drummond was manager of the Western Montana Electric Generating and Transmission Cooperative in Missoula, Mont., for 17 years. From 1988 to 1994, he led the Public Power Council, an association of all Northwest publicly owned utilities.

During his 30 years in the energy industry, Drummond has been a leader on many regional task forces and committees, including the Bonneville Environmental Foundation, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, Northwest Wind Integration Forum and Northwest Energy Efficiency Task Force.

Nationally, he has served on committees of the American Public Power Association and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

Current BPA Administrator Steve Wright announced his plans to retire in June of last year, and Drummond will begin serving as administrator following Wright’s retirement.

“I also want to thank Steve Wright for his outstanding leadership of BPA and congratulate him for his achievements over the past 12 years in which he has served as administrator,” said Poneman.

The Energy Department conducted a competitive process under the federal civil service rules to select a new BPA administrator. BPA has annual revenues exceeding $3.2 billion, more than 3,100 full-time employees, and employs approximately 1,500 contractors.

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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