Letters to the Editor for January 26, 2013

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letters

Global warming

Thank you for publishing our letter to President Obama, “The time is now to reverse global warming.” We will follow up our view that the president can act in many ways that do not require the approval of a paralyzed Congress to counter the catastrophe that is global warming.

The list of our names shown is incomplete, and we’d like to add these: Keith Harding, Peter Cornelison, Jim Denton, Will Chamberlain, Gene Euwer, Gary Fields, Howard Larry Kading, John Marker, Roger Nelson, Helmut Riedl, Mike Stillman, Bob Williams, Steve Labadie, Roger Holen, David S. Adams, Eric Strid and John Ihde.

David Hupp

Hood River

Take time for survey

The Port of Hood River is working on exciting plans to transform the land next to Nichols Basin into a narrow park with a waterside path, beautiful landscaping and improved beaches and boat launches. The path will complete the missing gap in the trail from the Event Site to the pedestrian bridge over the Hood River.

Won’t it be great to walk on a continuous paved trail from the Hood River Inn all the way to the Waterfront Park? No more walking in the road or on the weedy/dusty/broken glass-littered shoulder.

The port has applied for a couple of grants to fund the project.

The first one is an ODOT/Transportation Enhancement grant for design work and preliminary engineering. This grant has an online survey up now through Jan. 31 where the public can show their support for the project.

I encourage everyone in favor of a walkable waterfront to take three minutes to fill out the survey: http://svy.mk/XFg5a7.

You can find out more information about the project on the port’s website.

Heather Staten

Hood River

Need gun law change

Thank you, Sheriff English, for your thoughtful decision to protect the rights of all citizens of your county. President Obama’s gun regulation will need fair and thoughtful consideration by all our elected officials.

The statistics appall me. Last year guns killed 48 people in Japan, eight in Great Britain, 34 in Switzerland and 11,000 in the United States. We spend billions on security threats abroad but do little to improve security from assault weapons and handguns that have killed 30,000 people.

When is enough enough? The right to bear arms is not more important than the right to grow up.

I implore our congressmen to vote yes on legislation to maintain and strengthen the Brady Law and the Brady Campaign to End Gun Violence. This is not controversial. Nobody wants dangerous people to get their hands on dangerous weapons and one of the ways we prevent this is to require background checks on all gun sales.

Our congressmen must vote to reinstate the ban on assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines and support legislation to close the gun show loophole.

Sensible change in our gun control laws is long overdue.

Robin Merriam

Hood River

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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