CRITFC names Hicks enforcement chief

Sgt. Mitch Hicks


Sgt. Mitch Hicks

The Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission has promoted 20-year CRITFC Enforcement veteran Sgt. Mitch Hicks to chief of enforcement.

Hicks is a member of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes from the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho. He will begin his chief of enforcement duties Aug. 1.

“I am honored to lead one of the best enforcement entities in the region,” Hicks said. “I personally know how this work benefits Indian fishers along the Columbia River.

“My family, friends and I were subjected to harassment while exercising our tribal hunting and fishing rights. I remember having our salmon fishing camp shot at and being held at gunpoint while hunting in Idaho.

“My experiences have driven me to do what I can to prevent the harassment that I experienced as a boy from happening to anyone else.”

As the chief of law enforcement, Hicks is responsible for the overall management of CRITFC’s enforcement department. Based in Hood River, CRITFC Enforcement employs 17 patrol officers, dispatchers and administrative staff and is responsible for patrolling 147 miles of the Columbia River and 31 tribal fishing access sites.

“Mitch has a dedication to the tribal members that fish the Columbia River and the careful protection of their treaty fishing right that spans his entire career,” said Paul Lumley, executive director for the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission.

“Enforcement of tribal treaty fishing rights is the backbone of tribal sovereignty and Mitch’s dedication will serve the tribes well.”

Hicks graduated from Idaho State University and has spent his entire enforcement career with the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. He was originally hired in April 1993 as a patrol officer and was promoted to sergeant in August 2000. He is an avid outdoorsman that enjoys spending time with his wife, Tiffany, and two children, Jake and Melissa.

Hicks takes over for Davis Washines, who retired from CRITFC’s chief of enforcement position after three years of service. Washines remains with CRITFC as a policy analyst.

Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission is the technical support and coordinating agency for fishery management policies of the Columbia River Basin’s four treaty tribes: the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the Nez Perce Tribe. CRITFC website: www.critfc.org.

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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