PARKDALE NEWS: It’s time to go to the fair!

This is the week all the Upper Valley 4-H and FFA kids have been waiting for all year to take their animals and projects to fair.

While it’s important for them to have a great showing at the Hood River County Fair Animal Auction, they are also showing a year’s worth of hard work in projects such as sewing, cooking, canning, displays, photography and much more.

Animals that have been raised by FFA and 4-H’ers can be found in the livestock and poultry and rabbit barns, and their projects can be viewed at 4-H exhibit building, otherwise known as the Summit building at the fairgrounds.

Friday, July 27, at 4:30 p.m. will be the all-important animal auction, when these FFA and 4-H kids get a chance to show off their showmanship and hopefully entice bidders to help them support next year’s animal projects.

For questions about how you or your company can bid on these animals for yourself or for resale, contact the Hood River County Extension Office at 541-386-3343.

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If you are an Upper Valley grower, resident or property owner with a deer or elk problem, Forrest Frantz is seeking tracking information and photos taken of herds or damage from you.

A large group of concerned property owners turned out to hear suggestions for the control of deer and elk at a recent meeting at the Parkdale Fire Department.

Presentations were made by Parkdale resident Franz and Mike Moore, assistant district wildlife biologist from The Dalles district office of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Frantz presented information he has gathered over the last year regarding primary habitat and migration patterns for deer and elk in the Parkdale area and fence locations and damage.

Moore discussed several options landowners can utilize to protect their property and orchards from the damage these animals cause, including use of “hazing” by permit, LOP (Landowner Preference program) permits for additional time limits to hunt on your property and additional tags, and fencing.

Ian Tolleson with the Oregon Farm Bureau also discussed solutions that several groups in other areas have used with some success over the past nine months that included feed-based programs and feeding stations in addition to the hunting with the LOP.

Local orchardist Randy Kiyokawa closed the meeting suggesting forming pod groups to further this discussion.

Forrest Frantz can be sent information regarding deer and elk migration or photos at forrestfrantz@gmail.com.

If you would like further information on control options including the LOP program, contact Mike Moore at Michael.moore@state.or.us.

To contact Randy Kiyokawa regarding the pod group, email him at randykiyo@gmail.com.

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The Mt. Hood Town Hall board would like to thank everyone in the community who donated items to the recent yard sale or who came out to purchase items at the fundraiser.

“The Town Hall raised about $1,100, which equals a few new windows as part of the continued renovation for the building’s 100th birthday next year,” said board member and yard sale organizer Bob Danko. “We really appreciate the community’s support of our ongoing efforts.”

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Send items to: UVupdate@yahoo.com.

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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