Documentary ‘Coal’ airs June 19

Oregon Public Broadcasting announces “COAL,” an EarthFix original documentary that will air on OPB-TV on Wednesday, June 19, at 10 p.m.

“COAL” is the result of months of reporting by EarthFix on the Northwest’s coal-export debate. The film will explore the question of whether Northwest coal ports should be built — digging into the potential environmental consequences and meeting people from all sides of the issue who have much at stake.

The film was produced by filmmakers Katie Campbell and Michael Werner from KCTS 9 in Seattle.

examine the complex issues surrounding the question of whether or not to build coal export terminals in the Pacific Northwest, from a number of perspectives.

The Northwest is in the middle of a controversial global debate: Should the region build export terminals that would open lucrative markets for the world's dirtiest fossil fuel? As the U.S. economy continues to struggle, can the country afford not to? This documentary explores the future of America’s coal, and takes viewers from the coal mines of Wyoming and Montana to the waters of Washington and Oregon where new facilities are being planned that would turn the Northwest into the largest domestic exporter of coal.

“As I produced this film, it became clear that the issue of coal trains travelling through the Northwest is more than just a regional story. It’s a story with national and international reach,” said Katie Campbell, a multimedia journalist at KCTS 9 who is part of EarthFix, a public media partnership of Pacific Northwest stations focused on reporting stories about environmental issues. “What happens here—in this corner of the country—will have a huge impact on our nation’s energy policy, the country’s economic recovery, and our foreign relations with the fastest growing superpowers in Asia.”

“We take the audience to some unique places, places most people never get to see firsthand,” Campbell commented. “We went deep inside some of the largest open pit coal mines in the world. We traveled to a mountaintop research station. We boarded massive cargo ships that navigate the narrow waters of the Columbia, which might one day carry coal through the Northwest. In some cases, where we weren’t allowed to photograph in certain places, we opted to fly over them and shoot aerials.”

COAL airs Wednesday, June 19 at 10:00 p.m. on OPB-TV and will also be available for viewing online at the EarthFix site.

Follow @EarthFixMedia on Twitter and use the hashtag #NWCoal.

COAL is a KCTS 9/EarthFix original documentary. Visit the EarthFix site for more information.

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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