Summer Stories: unseen images from the season

‘Ah, Baby, Those Are Such Great Shoes’

Taking his final turns, at least for awhile, in his beloved May Street School gym, Kyle Turner tows kids around the floor on Aug. 15, the final day of his summer PE camps. Turner, most recently a classroom teacher at HRMS, was the PE teacher at May Street in the early 2000s, and is off to Pennsylvania this fall for his master’s degree in education..

Photo by Kirby Neumann-Rea.
Taking his final turns, at least for awhile, in his beloved May Street School gym, Kyle Turner tows kids around the floor on Aug. 15, the final day of his summer PE camps. Turner, most recently a classroom teacher at HRMS, was the PE teacher at May Street in the early 2000s, and is off to Pennsylvania this fall for his master’s degree in education..

The line from Jack Johnson’s hit song fit like comfy loafers in not one but two downtown Hood River events this summer: Elena Kroll and Matthew Oldfield make “comic book shoes” as part of the teen craft program at the Hood River Library, guided by Harley Judd. Ireland Wahl, 9, holds “Galaxy“ as she waits for artist Courtney Berens to put the design on her new Toms shoes. Doug’s Sports hosted the third annual “one for one” program: With every purchased pair, Toms gives a pair to a needy child. Berens was one of nine local artists who painted the custom designs to make such great shoes. In close-up: Nika Kermani paints a floral design.

STERNWHEELER

Temporary tents imitate permanent landscape at the annual Mountain Man gathering at Cascade Locks’ Thunder Island, during the Sternwheeler Days festival. As the “settlers” find shade in the late June sun, the triangular shape of the canvas takes on a striking resemblance to Table Mountain and Greenleaf Peak, across the Columbia River in Washington state.

ARREST

A man was arrested at Windmaster Corner on suspicion of stealing Fritz Von Lubken’s garbage can and making off with it on skateboard. Deputies and Sheriff Matt English, right, returned the can and other belongings to Von Lubken (left), but Chief Deputy Brian Rockett handled the skateboard, flipping it up and into his hand with a deft tip of his foot, suggesting the lawman has some experience shredding sidewalk.

E. COLI

The water was … fine, for this family that cooled off at the Event Site on July 3. It was one of four days in mid-summer when water quality warnings were posted at the beach following measurements of high E.coli counts in the water. The contaminant spikes quickly faded, and Event Site enjoyed its usual busy summer. (And this mom only let baby’s toes enter the water.)

the PINES

A sticking point while moving in: At The Pines Winery’s new quarters on Cascade Street, Sierra Wright halted matters July 30 when she saw a small but vexing detail, pulling out a putty knife to remove a piece of gum from beneath the long bar. A crew moved the bar two blocks from the former State Street location, and before it got reassembled Wright wanted to make sure the bar got a fresh start.

KYLE TURNER

Taking his final turns, at least for awhile, in his beloved May Street School gym, Kyle Turner tows kids around the floor on Aug. 15, the final day of his summer PE camps. Turner, most recently a classroom teacher at HRMS, was the PE teacher at May Street in the early 2000s, and is off to Pennsylvania this fall for his master’s degree in education.

POMEGRANATE

“Do you know what I am?” Julie Ueland of Hood River Juice Company queried the July 4 parade crowd. “Do you know what I am?” Few knew, but it was clear she was neither pear nor apple. “A pomegranate!” she called out from inside the fabric costume representing the latest fruit to go into the Ryan’s Juice line.

LAVENDER MOE

Moe Dixon knows how to entertain. The renowned Hood River troubadour, who never knew a song he didn’t know, can fill a room, or a garden, or turn his attention to just one listener at a time. At Lavender Daze near Odell in July, when the photographer positioned himself under an arbor in back of Moe, for an “over the shoulder” shot, the singer suddenly turned and faced the camera for an unexpected angle.

BLUEBERRIES

How can two guys be so serious about blueberries? Is it that John Metta, left, and Bob Fox of Fox Tail Cider in Odell, wanted to make sure in preparing their first batch of unique blueberry cider that they avoided spilling even one precious purple orb? Maybe, except that between mash loads, they busily crammed berries into their mouths. “This is lunch, and they are delicious,” Metta said. (The cider should be ready to drink this fall.)

WALLERS

A classic tableau of humans and their canine protector, Marley, enjoying a picnic on an early summer evening (not the blankets) as Dave and Nancy Waller and their daughter Laura settle in at the first concert in the series known as Families in the Park, a Hood River tradition blending good music, good food, and good company. The shows will be back next August.

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Parkdale third graders sing "12 Disaster Days of Christmas"

Welcome to your sing-able Christmas gift list. What follows is an emergency rendition of “12 Days of Christmas” – for outfitting your home or car in case of snow storm, earthquake, flood or other emergency. Read it as a simple list, or sing it to the tune of “12 Days” – you know, as in “ … and a partridge in a pear tree…” Not to make light of it, but the song is a familiar framework for a set of gift ideas that you could consider gathering together, even if the recipient already owns items such as a bunch of coats, tire chains and flashlights. Stores throughout the Gorge are stocked up on all these items. Buying all 12 days might be prohibitive, but here are three ideas for checking any of the dozen off your list (notations follow, 1-12.) The gift items needed to stay warm, dry and safe are also coded to suggest items in your abode (A) in your car (C) or both (B). 12 Gallons of Water (A) 11 Family meals (B) 10 Cans of propane (A) 9 Hygiene bags (B) 8 Packs of batteries (A) 7 Spare coats (B) 6 Bright red flares (C) 5 Cozy blankets (B) 4 Tire chains (C) 3 Flashlights (B) 2 cell phone chargers (B) 1 And a crush-proof first aid kit (B) Price ranges? Here’s a few quotes for days Three, Two, Four and Nine: n A family gift of flashlights (three will run $15-30, Hood River Supply, Tum-A-Lum) n Cell phone chargers (two will run $30-60) n Tire chains (basic set, $30, Les Schwab, returnable if unused for the winter) n Family meals ($100 or so should cover the basics for three or four reasonably well-fed days) n The home kit should be kept in a handy place near an exit, and remember that water needs to be replenished every few months. If you have a solid first aid kit already, switch out the gift idea with “and-a-sto-o-u-t- tub-for it-all …” Otherwise, it’s a case of assembling your home or car kits and making sure all members of the family know what the resources are and how to use them (ie flares and propane). Emergency situations are at worst life-threatening, at best deeply uncomfortable if you and your family are left without power for an extended period, or traveling and find yourself in a situation where you need to wait out a storm, lengthy traffic delay, or other crisis. Notes on the 12 gift ideas: 12 – Gallons of water: that’s one per person in a four-member family to last for three days, the recommended minimum to be prepared for utility outages. 11 – Easy-open packaged goods, energy bars, dried food and nuts are good things to include for nutrition. Think of what your family of four needs for three days to stay fortified and hydrated (see number 12). Can-opener also recommended 10 – If you have a propane camping stove, keep extra fuel handy. 9 – Hygiene bags: put packaged moistened towelettes, toilet paper, and plastic ties in large garbage bags (for personal sanitation) Resource list courtesy of Hood River County Emergency Management, Barbara Ayers, manager/ 541-386-1213. The county also reminds residents to Get a Kit, Make A Plan to connect your family if separated, and Stay Informed. See www.co.hood-river.or.us to opt-in for citizen alerts. Enlarge



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