YESTERYEARS: Cooper Spur district gets electric service in 1947

October 18, 1997 — Mike Butcher, left, and Phil Hukari enter the tomb of the unknown mummy during the Hood River Valley High School staff’s air guitar rendition of “Walk Like an Egyptian.” The air guitar competition was one of the many homecoming festivities held at the high school this past week.

Hood River News archives
October 18, 1997 — Mike Butcher, left, and Phil Hukari enter the tomb of the unknown mummy during the Hood River Valley High School staff’s air guitar rendition of “Walk Like an Egyptian.” The air guitar competition was one of the many homecoming festivities held at the high school this past week.

1917 — 100 years ago

Three cents for a letter and two cents for a post card — that’s the rate at which you will do business with Uncle Sammy on and after Nov. 2. This increase in postage is one of the ways the government has been raising money with which to prosecute the war against Hohenzollernism (sic), so that no one will object to the increased postal rates.

VERBATIM: Dynamite Fuse Is Found In Floor

Men Engaged In Wrecking Old Dan Wuille Building, Make Strange Discovery

While wrecking the old Dan Wuille office on State Street Monday, workmen found under the floor of the former manager’s office two sticks of dynamite, cap and fuse attached. The paper in which the dynamite was wrapped indicated that the explosive was placed under the building in the fall of 1934. Whether the fuse had been ignited and had gone out could not be ascertained.

The plant and office has been operated for several years by the American Fruit Growers, and Carl Newman has been, each fall, in charge of operations. It had already been acquired by the AFG when the dynamite and fuse was placed under the building.

When the explosive was found it was obvious that it had been placed under the building several years ago, and one guess as to why it was placed there is as good as another.

Two years before, an attempt was made to burn a nearby apple storage plant, but the miscreants were disturbed by a night watchman and decamped. Whether or not these firebugs returned to the warehouse they had previously attempted to destroy, and tried to blow it up, it is not known. It is recalled that, about the same period, prowl cars nightly patrolled the packing plants in the valley, owing to threats that sabotage and arson were to be resorted to by malcontents from other fruit growing districts.

— Hood River News, October 15, 1937

1927 — 90 years ago

Cascade Locks again furnished the location for a big still hunting party on Tuesday of this week, when state and local officers from Hood River captured one of the most expensive liquor making equipments ever seen in this city. The still, of a capacity of 200 gallons of mash, was of pure copper and the worm, boilers and other apparatus were all of good workmanship and clean. It is estimated that the entire equipment must have cost around $2,000, and there was evidence that the output from that distilling plant must have been considerable.

1937 — 80 years ago

Not only is School District No. 3 (city schools) in excellent financial condition, with its buildings in good repair, but there is now every prospect that all outstanding bonds will be retired by the end of 1940. In addition, by next year, all depression salary cuts will have been effaced and salaries will again be at the pre-depression normal. And, of keen interest to taxpayers, is the fact that the tax millage is to be reduced, according to the new budget, published in the News.

1947 — 70 years ago

With the completion of a 7,200-volt line into the Cooper Spur district of Hood River County, Pacific Power and Light Company has now brought electric service into a new Hood River Valley area, well inside the Mt. Hood National Forest, C.O Bunnell, PP&L district manager, said Thursday. Electricity from the new line is expected to be an important factor in developing new farms in the lower part of the now sparsely-settled territory, and in establishing a colony of new summer homes in the recreational area within the forest boundary. New farm users of electricity now located in the area served by Cooper Spur line include: Homer Rogers, W.G. Bennett, W.W. Bennett, Henry Fischer, Wallace Moody and F.R. Myrick. Thus a dream for many years in the Cooper Spur district has now become a reality.

1957 — 60 years ago

The dedication of the new May Street Elementary School has been scheduled for Tuesday evening, Nov. 5, 1957. Dr. Rex Putnam, state superintendent of public instruction, will give the dedication address. May Street School was designed by Edmundson, Kochendoerfer, architects, and Evan Kennedy, structural engineer, of Portland. The building was accepted by the city school board on Oct. 1. The district has occupied the building since May 15. The construction contract was let for $472,705; however, the final adjusted contract amounted to $469,529, the decrease due to the changes authorized by the school district. May Street School has 14 classrooms, a library, offices, health rooms, cafetorium, kitchen, teachers’ rooms, lavatories and boiler room. At present, the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grades are housed in the building for a total of 325 pupils and 12 teachers.

1967 — 50 years ago

Winter pear packout has fallen some 800,000 boxes below last year’s level and more than 700,000 boxes below the 1967 harvest estimate. In terms of totals, Comice pears saw the sharpest percentage drop. Bosc pear harvest was less than half the estimates, and the largest winter pear crop, Anjou pears, was also down.

1977 — 40 years ago

A joint proposal to bring in an outside specialist to look at city and county urban growth proposals won county approval here Monday, but only after extensive debate. When the decision was finally approved, it was by a 3-2 vote, and then with the provision clearly specified that the county was not necessarily bound by any of the findings. The suggestion for an outside study and fact finding came because the city and county can’t agree on where projected city growth should be encouraged for the next 25 years. The city favors more restricted lines, with a southern boundary formed by Eliot and Brookside drives. The county favors a much more extensive area, extending south to a Tucker Road junction with Orchard Road generally known as the Douglas Corner.

1987 — 30 years ago

The late James E. Klahre, a founder of Next Door, Inc., and board member for many years, will be honored at a special ceremony Saturday. The residence housing the program will be dedicated in his name. Klahre was also a local and national leader in the fruit industry. Michael Mehling, Next Door director, says the Klahre House will serve as a fitting memorial for someone who devoted so much time and attention to the program. James Klahre died in 1986 at the age of 92 after chairing the board since 1971, when Next Door was created.

1997 — 20 years ago

A local water district will help the city of Hood River prevent a potential water shortage. Crystal Springs Water District agreed to sell water to the city during the month-long construction project on the city’s Cold Springs water source. The city sought the purchase from Crystal Springs after failing to reduce local consumption to the point that its two back up water sources can meet demand while Cold Springs is offline.

2007 — 10 years ago

Hood River Middle School auditorium dedication and open house will be Oct. 22. The community is invited to see the renovated auditorium, a 1927 building listed on the National Historic Registry. Restoration work, following last winter’s storm damage, cost about $800,000.

— Compiled by Trisha Walker, news staff writer

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